Martin & Kent, L.L.C. Martin & Kent, L.L.C.

attorneys

May 2017 Archives

Illinois jury convicts drug suspect in absentia

An Illinois jury convicted a former Aurora resident of unlawful delivery of illegal drugs on May 23 even though he was not present in the courtroom to hear the verdict read. Reports indicate that a Kane County judge issued a warrant for the 40-year-old man's arrest after he failed to appear for his trial on May 22. The man's sentencing hearing has been scheduled for June 6. He faces a custodial sentence of between nine and 40 years.

Bathroom break leads to drug charges in Illinois

The Illinois State Police says that an inopportune bathroom break in Champaign County on the afternoon of May 17 led to drug possession charges for two men. The 26-year-old and 27-year-old Tennessee residents were charged with marijuana possession and marijuana possession with the intent to distribute after about 5 pounds of the drug were allegedly recovered from their vehicle. They face up to 15 years in prison if convicted on all counts.

Types of internet fraud

Illinois residents may have heard of various types of internet-based crimes such as using phishing to try to get someone's personal information. Activities like this fall under the larger umbrella of internet fraud.

Defining assault and battery

In the state of Illinois, a prosecutor may charge a person with both assault and battery despite the fact that the two crimes may be closely related. The state defines assault as conduct that could cause fear of being subject to physical harm. To prove a charge of battery, a prosecutor must show that there was contact that resulted in bodily harm. It may also be established that unwanted physical contact took place.

Penalties for weed possession in Illinois

Illinois residents may have heard about a drug ordinance passed by the Peoria City Council on May 9. It says that a person caught with 10 grams of marijuana or less would pay a $125 fine for a first offense. The fine would increase to $250 for a second offense and up to $750 for a fourth offense. That fine could be paid at City Hall in person or mailed there according to the city manager.

Judge sentences man on theft, burglary and contempt charges

Media outlets in Illinois have reported that a 51-year-old man was sentenced to five years in prison for burglary and theft on April 28 after a DuPage County judge was unconvinced by his vow to change his ways. The man was cited twice for contempt of court for his outbursts during a contentious and lengthy trial, and he observed his sentencing hearing and learned of his fate from the confines of a soundproof booth. The man will serve nine months in the DuPage County jail for the two contempt of court convictions after completing his prison sentence.

Guns and misdemeanor domestic abuse convictions don’t mix

A recent Supreme Court case has upheld a federal law stating that it is illegal to own firearms if you have been convicted of a misdemeanor domestic abuse charge. The determining Supreme Court case involved two men who had been convicted of misdemeanor assault charges against their romantic partners in Maine. Years after their conviction, the men were found to have both guns and ammunition in their possession, which violated the already established federal law that those who have been convicted of a misdemeanor domestic abuse charge cannot own firearms.

Ignition interlock devices reduce drunk driving risks

Illinois, like most states, requires first-time DUI offenders to have ignition interlock devices fitted to their vehicles. Many road safety advocates believe that these devices can deter repeat drunk driving and save lives, and a new study from the Colorado School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health seems to add weight to these arguments. The study, which was published in the April 2017 edition of the "American Journal of Preventive Medicine," suggests that the number of drunk driving accidents falls by 7 percent when mandatory ignition interlock laws are put into place.